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Drug Related Litter - 9th September 2017

Drug Litter 1 Drug Litter 2

Doorstep Callers, Cowboys and Scams - 9th September 2017

Trading Standards Poster 1 Trading Standards Poster 2

Phishing: How To Protect Yourself - 28th October 2017

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TSB Phishing Attacks - 27th May 2018

There has been a sharp rise in fraudsters sending out fake text messages (smishing) and phishing emails claiming to be from TSB. The increase in the number of reports corresponds with the timing of TSB’s computer system update, which resulted in 1.9 million users being locked out of their accounts. Opportunistic fraudsters are using TSB’s system issue to target people with this type of fraud.

 

Since the start of May there have been 321 phishing reports of TSB phishing made to Action Fraud. This is an increase of 970% on the previous month. In the same reporting period, there have been 51 reports of cybercrime to Action Fraud which mention TSB – an increase of 112% on the previous month.

 

Fraudsters are commonly using text messages as a way to defraud unsuspecting victims out of money. Known as smishing, this involves the victim receiving a text message purporting to be from TSB. The message requests that the recipient clicks onto a website link that leads to a phishing website designed to steal online banking details.

 

Although text messages are currently the most common delivery method, similar communications have been reported with fraudsters using email and telephone to defraud individuals.

 

In several cases, people have lost vast sums of money, with one victim losing £3,890 after initially receiving a text message claiming to be from TSB. Fraudsters used specialist software which changed the sender ID on the message so that it looked like it was from TSB. This added the spoofed text to an existing TSB message thread on the victim’s phone.

 

The victim clicked on the link within the text message and entered their personal information. Armed with this information, the fraudsters then called the victim back and persuaded them to hand over their banking authentication code from their mobile phone. The fraudsters then moved all of the victim’s savings to a current account and paid a suspicious company.

 

Protect Yourself:

 

Don’t assume an email or text is authentic:

 

Always question uninvited approaches in case it’s a scam. Phone numbers and email addresses can be spoofed, so always contact the company directly via a known email or phone number (such as the one on the back of your bank card).

 

Clicking on links/files

 

Don’t be tricked into giving a fraudster access to your personal or financial details. Never automatically click on a link in an unexpected text or email. Remember, a genuine bank will never contact you out of the blue to ask for your full PIN or password.

 

If you have received a suspicious TSB email, please do not respond to it, report it to us https://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_phishing and also forward it to emailscams@tsb.co.uk

 

Every Report Matters. If you have been a victim of fraud or cyber crime, report it to us online or by calling 0300 123 2040.

 

Visit Take Five and Cyber Aware for more information about how to protect yourself online.

TSB Port Out Alert - 27th May 2018

There has been an increase in reports made in May by TSB customers relating to “port-out” fraud. Fraudsters are number porting a victim’s telephone number to a SIM card under their control and then using the number to access the victim’s bank accounts.

 

The increase in the number of reports corresponds with the timing of TSB’s computer system update, which resulted in 1.9 million users being locked out of their accounts. Opportunistic fraudsters are using TSB’s system issue to target individuals, which follows the increase in phishing and smishing communications also targeting TSB customers this month. Victims’ bank account and personal details including their phone number are collected by the fraudster, providing them with the information to execute the fraud.

 

Number porting is a genuine service provided by telecommunication companies. It allows customers to keep their existing phone number and transfer it to a new SIM card. The existing network provider sends the customer a Port Authorisation Code (PAC), that when presented to the new provider allows the number to be transferred across. This service can, however, be abused by fraudsters.

 

To gain control of the victim’s phone number, fraudsters convince the victim’s mobile phone network provider to swap their number on to a SIM card in the fraudster’s control. Once the fraudster has control of the number they are able to intercept the victims’ text messages, allowing them to use services linked to the victim’s phone number. This can include requesting an online banking password reset or access to any two factor authentication services.

 

Victims have reported large losses as a result of this fraud. One victim initially dismissed text messages received from their network provider containing a PAC number. Two days later £6,000 was removed from the victim’s TSB current account. The victim subsequently contacted their phone provider and was informed that someone contacted the provider purporting to be the victim and had cancelled their contract and transferred their number to a new SIM. This action allowed the banking fraud to take place.

 

Protect Yourself:

 

PAC Code notifications

 

If you receive an unsolicited notification about a PAC Code request, contact your network provider immediately to terminate the request. Also notify your bank about your phone number being compromised.

 

Clicking on links/files:

 

Don’t be tricked into giving a fraudster access to your personal or financial details. Never automatically click on a link in an unexpected email or text. Remember, criminals can spoof the phone numbers and email addresses of companies you know and trust, such as your bank.

 

Requests to move money:

 

A genuine bank or organisation will never contact you out of the blue to ask for your PIN, full password or to move money to another account.

 

Port-out Fraud versus SIM Swapping

 

Port-out fraud is often incorrectly referred to as SIM swap fraud. SIM swap fraud works in a similar fashion, however, instead of porting the victim’s number to a new network provider, the fraudster impersonates the victim and requests a new SIM card for their account. Once they have access to the new sim, they have access to the number.

Watch Out For These Fake Texts About Your EE Bill - 21st June 2018

These fake text messages purport to be from EE and claim that you haven’t paid a bill. The link in the message leads to a phishing website designed to steal your EE account login details, as well as personal & financial information.

 

Don’t be tricked into giving a fraudster access to your personal or financial details. Never automatically click on a link or attachment in an unexpected email or text.

 

For more information on how to stay secure online, visit http://www.cyberaware.gov.uk

Courier Fraud - 21st June 2018

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has identified an increasing number of reports s_ubmitted to Action Fraud from the public concerning courier fraud.

 

Fraudsters are contacting victims by telephone and purporting to be a police officer or bank official. To substantiate this claim, the caller might be able to confirm some easily obtainable basic details about the victim such as their full name and address. They may also offer a telephone number for the victim to call to check that they are genuine; this number is not genuine and simply redirects to the fraudster who pretends to be a different person. After some trust has been established, the fraudster will then, for example, suggest;

 

- Some money has been removed from a victim’s bank account and staff at their local bank branch are responsible.

- Suspects have already been arrested but the “police” need money for evidence.

- A business such as a jewellers or currency exchange is operating fraudulently and they require assistance to help secure evidence.

 

Victims are then asked to cooperate in an investigation by attending their bank and withdrawing money, withdrawing foreign currency from an exchange or purchasing an expensive item to hand over to a courier for examination who will also be a fraudster. Again, to reassure the victim, a safe word might be communicated to the victim so the courier appears genuine.

 

At the time of handover, unsuspecting victims are promised the money they’ve handed over or spent will be reimbursed but in reality there is no further contact and the money is never seen again.

 

Protect Yourself

 

Your bank or the police will never:

- Phone and ask you for your PIN or full banking password.

- Ask you to withdraw money to hand over to them for safe-keeping, or send someone to your home to collect cash, PIN, cards or cheque books if you are a victim of fraud.

 

Don’t assume an email or phone call is authentic

Just because someone knows your basic details (such as your name and address or even your mother’s maiden name), it doesn’t mean they are genuine. Be mindful of who you trust – criminals may try and trick you into their confidence by telling you that you’ve been a victim of fraud

 

Stay in control

If something feels wrong then it is usually right to question it. Have the confidence to refuse unusual requests for personal or financial information.

 

For more information about how to protect yourself online visit

 

http://www.cyberaware.gov.uk  and http://www.takefive.stopfraud.org.uk

Police News and Appeals - 2nd July 2018

Dozens arrested in first week of drink and drug-driving crackdown

 

A total of 42 arrests have been made in the first week of a summer crackdown on drink and drug-drivers in Sussex.

 

The month-long operation was launched by Surrey and Sussex Police on Thursday 14 June, with the aim of catching criminals and keeping people safe on the roads.

 

Of those arrested, 25 have so far been charged to appear in court; the remaining have either been released under investigation or released without charge.

 

Officers will continue to proactively patrol and respond to reports of suspected drink and drug-drivers as the operation continues until Sunday 15 July.

 

If you’re prepared to drive under the influence of drink or drugs, prepare to face the consequences. This could include the following:

 

  • A minimum 12 month ban;

  • An unlimited fine;

  • A possible prison sentence;

  • A criminal record, which could affect your current and future employment;

  • An increase in your car insurance;

  • Trouble travelling to countries such as the USA.

 

People in Sussex can text officers on 65999 with the details of people they suspect of drink or drug-driving, or visit the Operation Crackdown website.

You can also contact the independent charity Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or report it online.

If you know someone is driving while over the limit or after taking drugs, call 999.

 

https://sussex.police.uk/news/dozens-arrested-in-first-week-of-drink-and-drug-driving-crackdown/

Sensor camera captures Horsham burglary suspects

 

Police have released images of two men sought in connection with a burglary in Horsham.

 

The suspects were caught on camera entering a house in Butlers Road, where they stole items including cash, cards, clothing, bags and medication. They also stole a grey Volkswagen Golf which had been parked on the driveway.

 

The images were captured by a doorbell sensor camera during the incident, which occurred in the early hours of Thursday 14 June.

 

The victims were alerted by a neighbour, who spotted their front door had been left open.

 

The first suspect is described as white, in his late 20s to early 30s, with short hair swept to the left. He was wearing a sweatshirt with a small white ‘NIKE’ chest print.

 

The second suspect is described as white, in his late 20s to early 30s, with a shaved head or very short hair. He was wearing a sweatshirt with a large black ‘NIKE AIRMAX’ chest print.

 

Anyone who recognises the men from the photos on our website or who saw what happened is asked to report it online or call 101 quoting serial 168 of 14/06.

 

Alternatively, you can visit the Crimestoppers website or contact the independent charity anonymously on 0800 555 111.

 

For advice on how to protect your home and belongings, see our burglary prevention page

 

https://sussex.police.uk/news/sensor-camera-captures-horsham-burglary-suspects/

Police Crime Summary - 2nd July 2018

There have been no burglaries of note this week however please be mindful in the hot weather to shut windows when you leave your property and if you are in the back garden for long periods of time please remember to lock the front door.

 

Further information can be found on our website.

 

https://sussex.police.uk/advice/protect-your-home-and-belongings/burglary/

 

This month’s Keep your Money safe Newsletter looks in a case study on money mules, demonstrating how fraudsters operate and prey on susceptible people by using their bank accounts to transfer money to different accounts, often overseas. Please click on the link or go to our website to read the newsletter.

 

https://sussex.police.uk/media/8754/fraud-newsletter-june-2018.pdf

 

Help us keep Sussex safe

 

If you saw or heard anything, or have any information about any incident in this message please contact us online, email us at 101@sussex.pnn.police.uk or call 101, quoting the reference number provided.

 

Alternatively you can contact the independent charity Crimestoppers, anonymously, on 0800 555 111, or online at http://www.crimestoppers-uk.org

 

Your local teams

 

Visit our Website to contact your local team, view local news and follow our social media accounts. Simply type your post code in the 'Find a Local Area' box located in the top right of the web page.

Police News and Appeals

13th July 2018

Patrol stumbles across Horsham shop raid

 

An incident at a Tesco Express shop next to a filling station in Redkiln Way, Horsham, shortly before 12.30am on Friday (6 July) is being investigated.

 

A police car on routine patrol happened to pull onto the garage forecourt and discovered a crime in progress.

 

Two men in balaclavas were stealing property from the shop and officers quickly called for assistance from other units.

 

One man ran off and is still being sought, but his accomplice, a 26-year-old man of no fixed address, was arrested on suspicion of aggravated burglary and is currently in police custody.

 

Anyone who saw what happened or who may have any other information concerning the incident is asked to contact Sussex Police online or by phoning 101, quoting Operation Latch.

 

Alternatively please contact Crimestoppers or phone the independent charity anonymously on 0800 555111.

 

https://sussex.police.uk/news/patrol-stumbles-across-horsham-shop-raid/

Two arrests after Horsham Street attack

 

Police are appealing for witnesses to an attack on two men aged 22 and 23, in Crawley Road, Horsham on Saturday, 30 June. The victims were walking home from the area of Tesco Express, Redkiln Way when the assault took place between 4.30am and 5am.

 

The 22-year-old man sustained serious facial injuries.

 

Following immediate police enquiries and a search of the area a 19-year-old man from Pulborough and a 20-year-old man from Horsham were arrested on suspicion of grievous bodily harm and of assault by beating. After being interviewed they were released under investigation.

 

Anyone who witnessed the incident is asked to contact Sussex Police online or by calling 101, quoting serial 233 of 30/6. Alternatively, you can contact the independent charity Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

 

https://sussex.police.uk/news/two-arrests-after-horsham-street-attack/

Police Crime Summary - 13th July 2018

Burglary

 

Reference: 0935 7th July

Location:  Forge Way, Billingshurst

Date and time: Between 1015hrs and 1535hrs 7th July

Details: Broke rear door, entered and stole cash.

 

Reference: 1023 7th July

Location: Forge Way, Billingshurst

Date and time: Between 1030hrs and 1545hrs 7th July

Details: Broke rear door, entered and stole several items.

 

Reference: 0608 10th July

Location: Coleridge Close, Horsham

Date and time: Between 0800hrs and 1210hrs 10th July

Details: Rear door was damage and entry gained to property. Laptops and Mobile phone stolen.

 

Reference: 1061 10th July

Location: The Brook, Southwater

Date and time: Between 1000hrs and 1500hrs 10th July

Details: Rear door broken and jewellery was stolen.

 

Reference:  1014 12th July

Location: Kings Road, Horsham

Date and time: Between 1400hrs & 1740hrs 12th July

Details: Went to shed and stole 3 Pedal Cycles.

 

Other than Dwelling

 

Reference: 0883 10th July

Location: Northdown Close, Horsham

Date and time: Between 0100hrs and 0700hrs 7th July

Details: A pedal cycle was stolen from an insecure shed.

 

Other

 

There has been a slight increase in Pedal cycle thefts in Horsham. Owners of pedal cycles are reminded to secure their property at all times using a good quality bike lock. Further information about how to secure pedal cycles can be found by clicking on the link or going to our website.

 

https://sussex.police.uk/advice/protect-your-home-and-belongings/cycle-theft/

 

Op Crackdown has recently added a new reporting category - "Close pass of a horse" to look to evidence an increasing amount of near miss reports that are received. This category is in addition to the "Close pass of a Cyclist" which has been in place for a year now. As with all reports to Op Crackdown - you will need the registration number of the vehicle concerned and ideally some form of corroborative evidence such as helmet cam. Cycling UK The British Horse Society

 

http://www.operationcrackdown.org

Did you know that we have our own Facebook and Twitter accounts?  Follow us on:

 

Facebook @Horshampolice

Twitter @Horsham_police

 

Like and follow our pages and keep up to date with the latest updates for your area.  

 

Help us keep Sussex safe

 

If you saw or heard anything, or have any information about any incident in this message please contact us online, email us at 101@sussex.pnn.police.uk or call 101, quoting the reference number provided.

 

Alternatively you can contact the independent charity Crimestoppers, anonymously, on 0800 555 111, or online at http://www.crimestoppers-uk.org